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Archived latest news items: August 2009

Monday 31 August

FISA press release:
Germany back on top at 2009 World Rowing Championships

Sunday 30 August

The 2009 World Rowing Championships concluded today in Poznan, Poland, in front of a very enthusiastic crowd of Polish and international spectators. A total of 945 athletes from 53 countries competed in the final regatta, the highlight of the World Rowing season.

Host nation Poland finished the regatta with a total of four medals, including two gold. The 2008 Olympic Champions in the men's quadruple sculls (M4x) extended their winning streak, winning a fourth World Championship gold medal on their home waters. New sculling star Julia Michalska of Poznan (world junior and under-23 champion) grabbed her first title at senior level in the women's double sculls (W2x) with partner Magdalena Fluarczyk in front of hometown fans. Poland also won silver in the lightweight women's double sculls (LW2x) and bronze in the lightweight men's four (LM4-).

Germany tops the medals table with a total of nine medals: four gold medals, one silver and four bronze. The new German line-up in the men's eight (M8+) finished the regatta in style, winning ahead of Canada and the Netherlands. Germany's Eric Knittel and Stephan Krueger strategically moved up the field from behind and won gold in the men's double sculls (M2x). The Schoemann-Finck and Kuehner brothers earned gold in the lightweight men's four (LM4-), in one of the most exciting finishes of the regatta, just 25 hundredths of a second ahead of Denmark. Germany also won the World Championship title in the lightweight women's quadruple sculls (LW4x).

New Zealand came in second on the overall medals table, with four golds and one bronze. Legendary men's single sculler Mahe Drysdale of New Zealand won his fourth consecutive World Championship title and set a new World Best Time. The new powerful combination of Hamish Bond and Eric Murray continued to master the men's pair (M2-) as they did throughout the 2009 Rowing World Cup season, winning comfortably ahead of Great Britain's Peter Reed and Andrew Triggs-Hodge. Duncan Grant won his third world gold in a row in the lightweight men's single sculls (LM1x), while Storm Uru and Peter Taylor took the world title in the lightweight men's double sculls (LM2x).

Great Britain finish in third position, with three golds, five silvers and one bronze. Two of the gold medals were earned in the adaptive boat classes (ASM1x and TAMix4+). The men's four (M4-) perpetuated the British winning streak in this boat class, winning gold ahead of Australia and Slovenia.

Doubling up in the women's pair (W2-) and in the women's eight (W8+), Zsuzsanna Francia and Erin Cafaro of the USA won two World Championship golds each. Olympic Champions in Beijing last year, this is the USA's third consecutive World Championship title in the women's eight.

Italy's Daniele Gilardoni keeps on winning, taking a tenth consecutive world title in the lightweight men's quadruple sculls (LM4x).

Paralympic rowing saw the level of competition rise at these World Rowing Championships with four new World Best Times set in the Adaptive men's single sculls (ASM1x), Adaptive women's single sculls (ASW1x), Adaptive double sculls (TAMix2x), as well as the Adaptive coxed four (LTAMix4+). A new boat class was added to the World Championship adaptive programme this year: the intellectually disabled coxed four (LTAIDMix4+). The International Paralympic Committee will decide later this year whether intellectually disabled events will be added onto the Paralympic Programme.

Visit www.worldrowing.com, the official website of the International Rowing Federation (FISA) and the World Rowing Championships, for points & rankings, detailed race reports, results and the photo gallery.

For more information - FISA media contact:
Marion Gallimore, Marketing and Communications Manager
Tel: +41 21 617 83 73 or direct +41 21 612 02 26, mobile +41 79 706 72 55
E-mail: marion.gallimore@fisa.org

On-site FISA Media Officer and Website Editor:
Debora Feutren, Publications and Website Editor
Mobile: +41 79 793 56 00
E-mail: debora.feutren@fisa.org


Monday 31 August

Saltwater Challenge Regatta, Saturday 12 September 2009

Essendon Rowing Club extends a warm invitation to all quad scullers to participate in the 2009 Saltwater Challenge to be held on the Maribyrnong River Melbourne.

Download the event bulletin (pdf, 272kb).


Thursday 27 August

A baby girl for Rowing Australia CEO, Andrew Dee!

Congratulations to Cath and Andrew Dee on the arrival of baby Olivia. Born Tuesday 25 August, 4.58 kg or 10lb 2, and 53 cm, sister to Riley. All well.


Wednesday 26 August

Boat donations urgently needed – new, old, dis-used or non functional

Vanuatu, Samoa and Tonga are in urgent need of rowing equipment.

As part of the AOC’s leadership in the Pacific region, Rowing Australia is calling on members within our rowing community for help.

To enable young athletes and their coaches in those nations to take the next step in their country’s rowing development, FISA, the AOC and Rowing Australia are attempting to assist our Pacific neighbours to find equipment. At present, the best athletes in Samoa, Vanuatu and Tonga train in old tub fours in joint training camps.

All three nations are in desperate need of any equipment (boats and oars) our community can donate. Any standard, of any age – but preferably singles, pairs or doubles.

The FISA, the AOC and RA will assist with arranging pick-up of the equipment from any state, and in any repairs needed to dis-used/non functional equipment.

If you are able to assist with any equipment donations, please contact:

Matt Draper
Operations Manager
National Rowing Center of Excellence
mdraper@rowingaustralia.com.au
+61 407 942 181 (M)

Shipping date is planned for the end of September.

Thank you in anticipation.


Sunday 23 August

Rowing Australia's coverage of the 2009 World Rowing Championships

10 Australian crews will compete at the 2009 World Rowing Championships in Poznan, Poland between 23 and 30 August.

Download the competition schedule (pdf, 36kb).

Visit the Rowing Australia website during the World Championships for:

  • Results for the Australian Team
  • Race reports from races with Australian crews
  • Interviews with members of the Australian Team
  • Previews of each day's racing
  • Daily reviews with National High Performance Director, Andrew Matheson
  • Media releases, and
  • Image galleries

Friday 21 August

RA media release:
Championships loom as Australia enters Poland

Thursday 20 August

The Australian Rowing Team is settling into Poland as they finalise preparations ahead of the start of the 2009 FISA World Rowing Championships on Sunday 23 August.

The team arrived in Poznan on Tuesday following an eight day training camp in Varese, Italy and have completed a few sessions on the Malta Regatta Course.

All 10 Australian crews are eager to begin their world championship campaign against the best rowers from around the world.

19 of the Australian team are making their senior team world championships debut, while 11 return from the 2008 Beijing Olympic team.

National High Performance Director Andrew Matheson says the eight days spent in Varese has left the team in good shape.

“The training facilities in Varese are superb and the AIS have done a superb job with all their facilities there and not just the rowing,” Matheson said. “We had some excellent water to row on for the entire camp.

“I have been impressed with the way all our crew have progressed since selection and I am looking forward to seeing them in action over the course of the regatta.”

The final draw will be made on Saturday at 3pm.

Please visit www.rowingaustralia.com.au for more information on the world championships.

For all media enquiries please call
David Polglase on +48 787 676 639


Friday 21 August

Rowing Australia's 2009 World Rowing Junior Championships image gallery

View images from the 2009 World Rowing Junior Championships in Brive-la-Gaillarde, France.


Monday 17 August

HEBFOTO images from World Junior Championships

HEBFOTOS now have images from the 2009 World Junior Championships on their website at www.hebfotos.com.


Monday 17 August

Well Rowed University
Melbourne University Boat Club
The First 150 Years

Beautifully designed and illustrated in both colour and black and white throughout, ‘Well Rowed University’ contains over 400 images, including early scenes ofMelbourne and the Yarra River rarely seen before. Also included with the book is a disc containing a searchable database of photographs, images and lists of historical interest.

Read more in the attached flier (pdf, 88kb) — includes an order form.


Saturday 15 August

NRCE Operations and Logistics Manager

The National Rowing Centre of Excellence invites suitably qualified candidates to apply for the position of Operations and Logistics Manager. The position is full time and will be based in Canberra.

This position’s primary purpose is to effectively manage the logistical and administrative operations of the NRCE and in particular the planning and conduct of international team tours, national training camps and selection trials. The successful candidate will also have program communications and financial management responsibilities.

Further details (including a position description).


Friday 14 August

Australian Olympic Committee press release:
Countdown to first ever Youth Games

Thursday 13 August

The inaugural Youth Olympic Games (YOG) is just one year away with Australian athletes very focused on qualifying for one of the most anticipated youth sporting events on the world stage.

“I am thrilled the International Olympic Committee (IOC) has committed to the YOG in an effort to reach out to young people and promote the benefits of a healthy and active lifestyle,” Olympian and Chef de Mission Nick Green said.

The YOG aims to inspire young people around the world to participate in sports, and adopt and live by the Olympic values. Athletes - aged between 14 and 18 years - will compete in 26 sports and take part in a Culture and Education Programme.

“We hope to send the maximum number of athletes allowed - 100 of Australia’s best young athletes from a range of sports – comprised of 70 individual athletes and approximately 30 athletes in two team sports,” Green said.

“Already we have qualified quota places in archery, canoe/kayak and rowing.”

“The YOG will provide these athletes with an invaluable experience, which we hope in turn, will lead to national representation at the Olympic Games.”

Singapore will host the first-ever YOG from 14–26 August 2010, receiving some 5,000 athletes and officials from 205 National Olympic Committees, along with estimated 800 media representatives, 20,000 local and international volunteers, and more than 500,000 spectators.

The sports program is similar to that of the London 2012 Games, with 26 sports comprising 201 events. Some events have been tailored by the International Federations (IF) to appeal to young people, such as basketball which has adopted the FIBA 3 x 3 formula, where teams of three will play against each other on a one half-court.  

“The IFs with IOC endorsement, developed the events for the sport program, based on youth relevance. Cycling, Basketball, Triathlon, Equestrian and Modern Pentathlon are the main sports with slight variations to the traditional events of an Olympic program,” Green said.

The Culture and Education program (CEP) aims to educate, engage and influence athletes about important global and sports issues in their communities. The program features fun and interactive activities, integrated into the sport competition schedule.

“We anticipate the CEP will engage our athletes to learn about the Olympic values Excellence, Friendship and Respect at the conclusion of their competition,” Green said.

The One Year to Go countdown will be celebrated in Singapore tomorrow (Friday 14 August) with the unveiling of the Omega countdown clock, sporting fun and celebrations with local sports personalities.

For media enquiries, please contact Frances Cordaro 0410 484 474.


Friday 14 August

FISA press release:
Crews announced for 2009 World Rowing Championships

Wednesday 12 August

From 23 to 30 August, close to a thousand of the world's leading rowers shall meet in Poznan, Poland, for eight days of competition to determine the 2009 World Rowing Champions in 27 events including five adaptive events. In total, 54 countries shall be present in Poznan, racing in 357 boats.

The three stages of the 2009 Rowing World Cup series leading up to this year's World Rowing Championships have given the rowing community a glimpse at potential
performances. Germany and the United States only just finalised their crews and Australia have stayed home choosing not to appear at any other Spring regattas this season.

This adds to the uncertainty that will unfold over the week that leads up to the A finals. An event that will have particular interest is the men's quadruple sculls. Poland are the reigning World and Olympic Champions and want to perform at their best in their home country. But this season Poland were beaten by a young Croatian crew. Germany's quad are also on top of their game. They have added the colourful single sculler Marcel Hacker to the mix and they have been posting fast times.

The women's eight never fails to excite and when the 2008 Olympic champion United States were beaten by perennial rivals Romania at the final stage of the Rowing World Cup, this would have fuelled the American fires to come back stronger in the event they love to win.

The big names from the 2008 Beijing Olympics are all going to be there in the men's single. Reigning World Champion Mahe Drysdale of New Zealand is unbeaten this season but he freely admits that Olympic champion Tufte (NOR), Campbell (GBR) and Olympic bronze medallist Synek (CZE) are constantly putting him under pressure. These rowers know how to give it all on the water and Drysdale knows that Olaf Tufte is the king of getting it right when it counts.

Rowing prides itself in the colourful characters that make up the sport from both newcomers to stalwarts. At Poznan the indomitable Estonian Jueri Jaanson, 43, is racing in the men's single sculls. Vaclav Chalupa, 41, of the Czech Republic is also competing at the better end of the men's pair. At the other end of the age spectrum, Denmark's Henrik Stephansen, 21, is the fastest lightweight on the indoor rowing machine in the world and he will compete in the lightweight men's double sculls. Stephansen will be up against France's 20 year old Jeremie Azou who has already medalled this season.

Entries, timetable, full reports, live audio streaming, live results and features are available on www.worldrowing.com.

The event semifinals and A Finals will be video streamed live from Thursday 27 to Sunday 30 and can be accessed through the www.worldrowing.com website.

For more information - FISA media contact:
Marion Gallimore, Marketing and Communications Manager
Tel: +41 21 617 83 73 or direct +41 21 612 02 26, mobile +41 79 706 72 55
E-mail: marion.gallimore@fisa.org

On-site FISA Media Officer and Website Editor:
Debora Feutren, Publications and Website Editor
Mobile: +41 79 793 56 00
E-mail: debora.feutren@fisa.org


Sunday 9 August

RA media release:
Australia claims four medals at junior championships

Saturday 8 August

Australia capped off a sensational World Junior Rowing Championships by winning four medals in Brive la Gaillarde, France.

In warm conditions Australia won a gold medal, two silvers and a bronze in the four finals they contested.

Anna Kaszycki (QLD), Hannah Vermeesch (WA), Peta White (SA) and Jessica Molsher-Jones (SA) won the gold medal in the women's four after a commanding row in the final.

They were the quickest qualifiers for the final from their heat on the opening day and always looked in control of the final, leading from start to finish.

The girls broke out to over a second lead after the first 500m over Great Britain and extended this during the middle part of the race.

The Australian girls, cheered on by their support crew, powered to the line to win in a time of 6:48.18, three seconds clear of Great Britain with China claiming the bronze medal.

Stroke of the women’s four crew, Jessica Molsher-Jones, was ecstatic with the performance after the race.

“We have been training really hard for this and we were able to pull off a great race on the day,” she said. “We didn’t expect to have such a good lead through the first 500m but were able to build on it and had over a boat length over Great Britain at the line. It is a great feeling.”

The men’s coxed four of Angus Moore (ACT), Joshua Hicks (WA), Samuel Collins (WA) and Thomas Amies (QLD), coxed by Nicholas Allen-Ducat (QLD), won silver to continue the strong Australian results on finals day.

Germany was in control of the race, building to a three quarter boat length lead through 1000m, while Australia and Italy had a tussle all the way down the course, racing bow ball to bow ball over the closing stages.

Australia held a canvas lead over Italy with 300 metres remaining and fought bravely to hold off the notoriously fast finishing Italian crew on the line by just under half a second in a time of 6:22.44.

The Australian women’s quad scull also claimed a silver medal after leading the field through the first 1000m.

Jessica Hall (QLD), Maddie Edmunds (QLD), Amy Fowler (ACT) and Alexandra Hagan (WA) were unable to hold off the fast finishing Chinese crew who led through the last 500m and recorded a 1.5 second victory.

Australia crossed the line in a time of 6:37.52, with New Zealand only 0.15 seconds behind in bronze position.

The Australian junior men’s four won a bronze medal behind Great Britain and Romania.

Daniel Brighthope (VIC), Michael Poulter (VIC), Thomas Chapman (TAS) and Tom Gatti (WA) were in second place through the 1000m mark but were overtaken by the Romanians in the third quarter of the race. Australia crossed the line in a time of 6:08.29.

The junior men's quad scull finished third in the B final to round out their regatta.

Louis Snelson (NSW), Cameron Smith (QLD), Benjamin Morley (QLD) and David Prosser (WA) only missed out on the A Final by nine hundredths of a second last night in one of the strongest fields the junior world championships has ever witnessed.

In the B Final Australia held third place through all 500m splits to complete the race in a time of 6:06.71. This left them four second adrift of the Italian crew, with the Netherlands finishing second.

National High Performance Director Andrew Matheson said the results were great for Australian rowing.

“We sent our junior crews to Europe with an aim to be successful and to win four medals is an outstanding achievement,” Matheson said. “All of the squad have come a long way this year and have bright futures ahead of them.”

Read full race reports.

For more information please call David Polglase on 0401 453 041


Sunday 9 August

Junior World Championships: race reports Day IV

Men's Quad Scull

The junior men's quad scull has finished third in the B final to round out their regatta.

Louis Snelson, Cameron Smith, Benjamin Morley and David Prosser only missed out on the A Final by nine hundredths of a second last night in one of the strongest fields the junior world championships has ever witnessed.

In the B Final Australia held third place through all 500m splits to complete the race in a time of 6:06.71. This left them four seconds adrift of the Italian crew, with the Netherlands finishing second.

Women’s Four

Anna Kaszycki, Hannah Vermeersch, Peta White and Jessica Molsher-Jones have won the gold medal in the women's four after a commanding row in the final.

They were the quickest quaifiers for the final from their heat on the opening day and always looked in control of the final, leading from start to finish.

The girls broke out to over a second lead after the first 500m over Great Britain and extended this during the middle part of the race.

The Australian girls, cheered on by their support crew, powered to the line to win in a time of 6:48.18, three seconds clear of Great Britain with China claiming the bronze medal.

Stroke of the women’s four crew, Jessica Molsher-Jones, was ecstatic with the performance after the race.

“We have been training really hard for this and we were able to pull off a great race on the day,” she said. “We didn’t expect to have such a good lead through the first 500m but were able to build on it and had over a boat length over Great Britain at the line. It is a great feeling.”

Men’s Coxed Four

The men’s coxed four of Angus Moore, Joshua Hicks, Samuel Collins and Thomas Amies, coxed by Nicholas Allen-Ducat, won silver to continue the strong Australian results on finals day.

Germany was in control of the race, building to a three quarter boat length lead through 1000m, while Australia and Italy had a tussle all the way down the course, racing bow ball to bow ball over the closing stages.

Australia held a canvas lead over Italy with 300 metres and fought bravely to hold off the notoriously fast finishing Italian crew on the line by just under half a second in a time of 6:22.44.

Men's Four

The Australian junior men’s four won a bronze medal behind Great Britain and Romania.

Daniel Brighthope (VIC), Michael Poulter (VIC), Thomas Chapman (TAS) and Tom Gatti (WA) were in second place through the 1000m mark but were overtaken by the Romanians in the third quarter of the race. Australia crossed the line in a time of 6:08.29.

View results.


Saturday 8 August

Junior World Championships: race reports Day III

Men's Four

The men's four of Daniel Brighthope, Michael Poulter, Tom Chapman and Tom Gatti booked their place in the final after a second-placed finish in their semi-final.

With three crews winning through from each semi-final the Australian crew placed themselves in a strong position from the start of the race when they led through the first 500m before settling back into second place behind Great Britain at the halfway mark.

The British and Australian crews were not challenged over the closing stages, with Great Britain crossing the line two and a half seconds clear of Australia, who recorded a time of 6:07.23.

Women's Quad Scull

The Australian women's quad scull scorched through to the final and cement themselves as one of the favoured crews for the final.

Jessica Hill, Maddie Edmunds, Amy Fowler and Alexandra Hagan were behind France for the first half of the race before kicking into top gear over the second 1000m.

Australia crossed the line in a time of 6:39.79, over two seconds clear of France, while New Zealand also progressed to the final.

Men's Quad Scull

Louis Snelson, Cameron Smith, Benjamin Morley and David Prosser narrowly missed out on qualifying for the final of the men's quad scull after finishing fourth in the semi-final.

Despite never being able to break into the top three throughout the race the Australian crew was never out of contention. They were a second behind Poland with 500m to row and pulled to within 9 hundredths of a second on the line.

Their time of 6:01.10 was four seconds behind the winning crew from Ukraine, while New Zealand also qualified for the final.

View results.


Saturday 8 August

RA media release:
Close racing paves way for international campaign

Friday 7 August

Australia’s 10 World Championship crews have completed their second last row before flying to Europe to compete in the 2009 World Rowing Championships in Poznan, Poland.

The team completed three head-to-head races on Friday morning in sunny conditions at the Sydney International Regatta Centre. They will stage one more round of racing on Saturday morning before departing Australia on Sunday.

In the first race of the morning the women’s double scull, women’s pair, women’s lightweight double scull and women’s four all showed positive signs across the 2000m. The crews went off a staggered time start to create a close finish, with the women’s lightweight double scull of Alice McNamara (VIC) and Bronwen Watson (NSW) winning on the line.

The men’s quad scull narrowly won the second event of the day to topple the men’s eight, men’s four and men’s lightweight four in an equally close finish that contained excellent racing pace.

Meanwhile Ben Houlison (NSW) continued his push for a medal in his first world championships campaign with a strong row. Houlison, entered in the men’s adaptive single scull, held off the adaptive coxed four in their race, who also showed they have come a long way since being selected in July.

National High Performance Director, Andrew Matheson, paid credit to all ten Australian crews.

“The progress made by all ten crews over the last four weeks was very noticeable in the three races this morning,” Matheson said. “We have based the racing today and tomorrow around a regatta format so I expect we will see some more improvement tomorrow.

“All the crews are looking forward to the world championships and there is a good feeling amongst the whole group.”

The Australian team arrives in Varese, Italy on Monday 10 August to complete an eight day training camp at the AIS European Training Facility.

They will then transfer to Poland on the Wednesday 19 August.

The 2009 World Rowing Championships run from 23–30 August at the Malta Regatta Course in Poznan, Poland.

View the full list of Australian crews.

For all media enquiries please call David Polglase on 0401 453 041


Friday 7 August

HEBFOTO images from Henley Royal Regatta and U23 World Championships

HEBFOTOS now have images from Henley Royal Regatta and U23 World Championships on their website at www.hebfotos.com.


Friday 7 August

RA media release:
More success for Australian juniors

The Australian Junior Rowing Team has enjoyed another successful day at the World Junior Rowing Championships in Brive la Gaillarde, France.

Only two Australian crews were in action on the second day of racing and the men’s coxed four and men’s quad scull both won through to the next round of competition.

The men’s coxed four charged into the A Final with an excellent row in their repechage. Angus Moore (ACT), Joshua Hicks (WA), Samuel Collins (WA) and Thomas Amies (QLD), coxed by Nicholas Allen-Ducat (QLD), battled with the Italian crew all the way down the course before prevailing in a time of 6:32.47, half a second clear of Italy.

South Africa and New Zealand also qualified for the final, which will be held on Saturday.

Louis Snelson (NSW), Cameron Smith (QLD), Benjamin Morley (QLD) and David Prosser (WA) finished second in their quarter-final of the men’s quad scull to progress to the semi-finals.

Gold medal favourites Germany were never challenged, but the Australian crew produced a superb final 500m to row past France and Croatia and into second place. Their time of 6:10.03 was three seconds shy of the German crew.

The men’s quad scull, women’s quad scull and men’s four will all contest semi-finals on Friday.

Read full race reports.

For all media enquiries please call David Polglase on 0401 453 041


Friday 7 August

Junior World Championships: race reports Day II

Men’s Coxed Four

The men’s coxed four charged into the A Final with an excellent row in their repechage. Angus Moore (ACT), Joshua Hicks (WA), Samuel Collins (WA) and Thomas Amies (QLD), coxed by Nicholas Allen-Ducat (QLD) had finished second in their heat on the opening day of competition but were always confident of rowing through their repechage.

Through the first 500m they sat in second place, only 0.18 second behind the Italian crew, with this margin only doubling as the two crews reached the halfway mark of the race.

By this time it was clear that these two crews would vie for the victory and Australia assumed the lead in the third quarter of the race and held on in a time of 6:32.47, half a second clear of Italy. South Africa and New Zealand also qualified for the final.

Men’s Quad Scull

Louis Snelson (NSW), Cameron Smith (QLD), Benjamin Morley (QLD) and David Prosser (WA) entered the quarter final of the men’s quad scull requiring a top-three finish to qualify for the next stage of racing.

They were matched against Germany again, favourites to win the gold medal, and they emphasised their strength by breaking to a four-second lead through 500m. Australia was in fourth place, but all crews outside Germany were tightly grouped.

With Germany assured of a place in the semi-final, the race was on for second and third, and Australia moved into third at the halfway mark, just over a second behind France. Croatia was still in contention however, and once again assumed third place from the Australian crew with only 500m to row.

Australia, to the delight of their support crew, kicked home over the closing stages and pushed through both France and Croatia to finish second in a time of 6:10.03.

View results.


Thursday 6 August

RA media release:
Australian juniors show strength on opening day

The Australian Junior Rowing Team produced a number of strong performances on the first night of competition at the 2009 World Rowing Championships at Brive le Gaillarde in France.

In scorching conditions in the south of France, the Australian women’s four made the final, while two crews progressed to the semi-finals and one to the quarter-finals.

The Australia women’s four of Anna Kaszycki (NSW), Hannah Vermeersch (WA), Peta White (SA) and Jessica Molsher Jones (SA) led from start to finish, qualifying directly for the final on Saturday night.

The Australian girls proved they were a class above the rest of the field as they leapt out in front of the field and won the race by a considerable margin of 14 seconds. Their time of 6:55.99 will give the crew confidence heading into the final.

Daniel Brighthope (VIC), Michael Poulter (VIC), Thomas Chapman (TAS) and Tom Gatti (WA) qualified for the semi final of the men’s four after a second place finish in their heat. They led through the first 1500m of the race and despite being overtaken in the closing stages by Slovenia, qualified in a time of 6:26.53.

Jessica Hall (QLD), Maddie Edmunds (QLD), Amy Fowler (ACT) and Alexandra Hagan (WA) entered the regatta in top form and showed their class in their heat of the women’s quad scull.

The Australian led from start to finish winning in a time of 6:49.78, four seconds clear of the Croatian crew, earning themselves a semi-final berth.

Louis Snelson (NSW), Cameron Smith (NSW), Benjamin Morley (VIC) and David Prosser (WA) finished third in their heat of the men’s quad scull in a time of 6:15.50 and will row in the quarter finals on Thursday evening.

Angus Moore (ACT), Joshua Hicks (WA), Samuel Collins (WA) and Thomas Amies (QLD), coxed by Nicholas Allen-Ducat (QLD), finished second in their heat of the men’s coxed four in a time of 6:25.50. With only one boat securing direct passage to the final, the crew will race in a repechage tonight in the attempt to qualify for the final.

Rowing Australia National High Performance Director Andrew Matheson was pleased with the results.

“These five crews, along with Australia’s other juniors, hold the key to the future of rowing in Australia and we have seen some positive signs overnight,” Matheson said. “Our coaches and development staff have done an excellent job to date, but the regatta will only get more difficult over the next three days.”

For more information please call David Polglase on 0401 453 041


Thursday 6 August

Junior World Championships: race reports Day I

Women’s Four

The Australia women’s four gave the Australian Junior Team the perfect start to the 2009 World Junior Rowing Championships.

Under scorching French skies at Brive le Gaillarde in France, Anna Kaszycki, Hannah Vermeersch, Peta White and Jessica Molsher-Jones led from start to finish, qualifying directly for the final on Saturday night.

The Australian girls proved they were a class above the rest of the field as they lept out in front of the field and won the race by a considerable margin of 14 seconds. Their time of 6:55.99 will give the crew confidence heading into the final.

Men’s Coxed Four

Angus Moore, Joshua Hicks, Samuel Collins and Thomas Amies, coxed by Nicholas Allen-Ducat, required a win in their heat of the men’s coxed four to gain direct qualification for the final.

After the first 500m of their race they were sitting in third place before they pushed into second at the 1000m mark. Germany had a stranglehold on the race however and were not challenged heading into the finish line as Australia secured second place behind them.

Their time of 6:25.50 left them six seconds behind Germany and they will row in the repechage in a bid to make the final.

Men’s Four

Daniel Brighthope, Michael Poulter, Thomas Chapman and Tom Gatti were the next Australians in action as they took part in the heats of the men’s four.

The first two crews would be granted a berth in the semi finals and Australia’s fine start to the race ensured they would have no problems progressing through to the next stage of the regatta.

They led through the first 1500m of the race and despite being overtaken in the closing stages of the race by Slovenia, they qualified in a time of 6:26.53.

Women’s Quad Scull

Jessica Hall, Maddie Edmunds, Amy Fowler and Alexandra Hagan entered the regatta in top form and showed their class in their heat of the women’s quad scull.

With a semi-final spot up for grabs for the winning crew, the Australians were aware they needed a strong start to their race. Their lead of four seconds through the first 500m asserted their dominance on the field from the early stages.

The Australian girls moved this margin out to seven seconds at the halfway mark of the race and were able to ease off in the closing stages of the race to win in a time of 6:49.78, four seconds clear of the Croatian crew.

Men’s Quad Scull

Louis Snelson, Cameron Smith, Benjamin Morley and David Prosser were the final crew in action as they contested the heats of the men’s quad scull.

Due to the large number of entries in this field, the first three crews across the line would only make progress to the quarter finals, making for a large program of racing.

Australia led through the first 500m and then moved back into second at the halfway mark of the race behind the Italian crew.

Italy proved too strong over the final half of the race to win in a time of 6:10.82, while Poland rowed through Australia in the final 500m to claim second. Australia however still progressed in a time of 6:15.50 and will row in the quarter finals on Thursday evening.

View results.


Monday 3 August

Information about recent changes to the NCAS Coach Accreditation System

Rowing Australia has recently completed a review of the structure, content and delivery of its coach education program with the ultimate aim of improving the National Coach Accreditation Scheme. As part of the review the previous coaching levels 1, 2, 3 and 4 have been renamed to provide guidelines for coaches to best decide which coaching level is most appropriate for them and their crews. The table below provides an overview of the coaching levels under the old NCAS program and the levels and course aims to which they relate under the revised NCAS.

Old Level New Level Aim
Level 1 Learn to Row Coach The Learn to Row Coach is aimed at the novice coach. It is anticipated the Learn to Row coach will have minimal background in rowing and will coach predominantly up to junior high school level or those in their first season of rowing. Examples of this type of coach are teachers and parents with non-rowing backgrounds and current rowing club members helping at the grassroots level. This program trains coaches who will coach beginners of all ages, teaching fundamentals and introducing non-rowers to the sport. These coaches will be provided with the compliance training, interpersonal skills and low level technical development skills to deal with the groups they train.
Level 2 Club/School Coach The Club/ School Coach is aimed at senior school and club coaches. This program trains coaches who already have some experience in the sport and aims to provide the coach with the knowledge and skills to develop athletes to their potential. They will have enough knowledge to develop an annual program, rig boats appropriately and develop younger athletes. Club/School coaches will provide coaching to the majority of athletes and will be required to tutor rowers of all ages and physical capacities. These coaches will have a basic sports science knowledge.
Level 3 Performance Coach The Performance Coach is aimed at coaches intending to work with State level teams, junior National teams and School head coaches. This program aims to develop the coach’s concepts of applied sports science, program management skills and the ability to develop less experienced coaches within their network. These coaches also have potential to develop workshops and information sessions which are important for coach development of all levels.
Level 4 High Performance Coach The High Performance Coach is an advanced accreditation level.  It is aimed at ‘professional’ head coaches working within high performance clubs and National Training Centre networks who are dealing with elite athletes. The High Performance Coach aims to train the coach to apply their coaching skills in a holistic manner, and work with a team of sports science experts to assist the athlete to achieve excellence. The High Performance Coach will focus on the role of the coach as a program manager, and will rely on expert coaches practising in the field to mentor High Performance Coach candidates.

In addition to renaming the levels of the NCAS, Rowing Australia has refined the
pre requisites for each level to ensure that the most appropriate and informative rowing specific program is delivered during the face to face courses. The first Learn to Row course was delivered recently and will be followed by the Club/School Coach and Performance Coach courses early in the New Year.  Pre-requisites for the Learn to Row course are outlined in the table below and will be followed by additional information for each of the other coaching course levels closer to their delivery.

Accreditation level Pre-requisite
Learn to Row Coach
  • At least 16 years of age
  • Beginning Coaching General Principles (ASC course)
  • Terminology worksheet

It is a pre-requisite that coaches wishing to enroll in a Learn to Row course complete the Australian Sports Commission Beginning Coaching General Principles modules which are available either online for free (https://learning.ausport.gov.au/) or face to face via local State and Territory Sport and Recreation Departments. Please note that the Beginning Coaching General Principles course is free if accessed online but may incur a charge if obtained face-to-face.

Additional information is available via the Australian Sports Commission website.

Regan Sanders
National Community Development and Education Officer
Rowing Australia
ph Direct (02) 6256 5999
fax          (02) 6256 5955
rsanders@rowingaustralia.com.au


Sunday 2 August

Time out with Sarah Cook

2007 and 2008 varied significantly for you in the Women’s Pair. What lessons have you learnt from your first Olympic campaign?

I learnt a lot from my first Olympic campaign. Although the individual lessons are varied and many, I think the biggest thing for Kim [Crow] and I as the pair can take from the Beijing campaign towards London, is to have learnt from each of these experiences and to be better for them and most importantly not to let them happen again. Individually however my goal since Beijing has been to make myself the best athlete I can be, and to use the 08/09 season to improve my weaknesses and keep moving forward with my strengths. It is clear that for an event like the pair it is experience, time and consistency that will ultimately lead to success.

2009 has a fresh feel for the whole of Australian rowing. How have you reset your goals after Beijing?


My goals have not changed; my number one goal has always been to win an Olympic gold medal in the women's pair and that is still my goal and focus. Obviously we did not achieve this in Beijing, but I believe our performances in 2008 were not indicative of our capabilities as a pair or for myself as an individual. I'm looking forward to the 2009 World Championships and every race leading to 2012. The changes that have happened since Beijing — which include a move to SUBC and training under Phil Bourguignon, Kim and I regrouping after eight months out of the pair, and our new pair coach Laryssa Biesenthal doing a fantastic job with us — I think will all stand us in good stead as a combination going forward.

This is the third season you and Kim Crow have been rowing in the women’s pair. What are some of the areas you have improved on during this time and what areas do you still need to work on?

Since being back in the pair, Kim and I have had a big focus on coming together technically. We have made some big improvements and are looking forward to seeing how this translates into boat speed over the coming weeks. We are always looking to work on our strength and fitness as well, and we have both moved forward in these areas throughout 2009. We view our pair as a wor- in-progress towards 2012 and will look to build, step up and move forward every year.

When you are away from rowing, what are some of the activities that you like doing?

I'm one subject away from graduating from my Bachelor of Applied Science in Human Biology at the University of Canberra, and I' ve just started an Advanced Diploma in Remedial Massage at CIT. In my spare time I like watching movies and cooking.

The World Championships in Poland will be the only overseas tour in 2009. What has it been like spending more time at home this year?

Spending more time at home has been a nice change. It has given Kim and I more time together to re-build and to get to know our new coach Laryssa, without the stresses of international travel and competition.

What are your expectations for the World Championships this year?

My aim is of course to win, however this year has been about putting together a strong base to ensure success over the coming years, but most importantly for London 2012. So in Poznan, I will be aiming to execute our ideal profile and race plan to the best of my ability, and to work with Laryssa and Kim to put together a performance we can be proud of and that truly represents our capabilities.

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